Category Archives: Article

New Zealand fisheries highly sustainable

Government research continues to show that New Zealand’s fisheries are highly sustainable and fish stocks are healthy, with 94% of the catch coming from stocks with no sustainability risks.

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Seabird awards recognise fishers for camera leadership

The Seabird Smart Awards, an initiative of the Southern Seabirds Trust, aim to recognise commercial and recreational fishers who have shown outstanding leadership and commitment to looking after New Zealand seabirds. Minister for Oceans and Fisheries, Hon David Parker and Minister of Conservation, Hon Kiritapu Allan presented the awards at an online ceremony this evening.

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Worldwide study on impacts of bottom trawling on health of seabeds

The first study of its kind, by Bangor University (Wales) with collaborating research institutes, published last week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Science (PNAS) builds on recent international collaboration. It brings together data from 24 large marine regions around the world to establish a relationship between distribution and intensity of trawling activities and the biological state of seabeds.

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Retraction of flawed MPA study implicates larger problems in MPA science

A retraction is a Big Deal in science, especially from a prominent journal. What’s strange in this story is how the conflict of interest intersects with science. The conflict of interest was apparent immediately upon publication, but it wasn’t until major problems in the underlying science were revealed that an investigation was launched, and the paper eventually retracted.

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Ray Hilborn on the Global Fishing Index 2021 report

Last month, the Minderoo Foundation released their 2021 Global Fishing Index report intending to give a global picture of fisheries status. Ray Hilborn has collaborated with the Minderoo Foundation in the past but says this report is highly flawed and should be viewed skeptically.

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Hoki and genomics technology

Scientists at Plant & Food Research have assembled the first genomic resources for hoki. This work was contracted by owners of hoki quota, who wish to ensure the sustainable management of our hoki fisheries continues to be supported by the best available scientific information. Hoki form our largest commercial fishery, annually contributing over $230 million to the economy and was the first New Zealand species to obtain Marine Stewardship Council certification.

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Partnering with CSIRO for orange roughy research

Deepwater fisheries quota owners have committed to a five-year scientific research and monitoring programme.

In partnership with Australia’s Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation (CSIRO), the programme aims to assess the biomass of selected deepwater fish stocks and to monitor and quantify fisheries interactions with deepwater benthic communities.

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Orange Roughy Certification

Deepwater Group (DWG) is pleased to announce the independent reassessment of three orange roughy fisheries for certification against version 2.0 of the Marine Stewardship Council’s Fisheries Standard will soon commence.

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Seafood insights: Q&A with George Clement

George Clement is without a doubt an icon within the New Zealand seafood industry. His accomplishments are countless. None more famous than placing New Zealand on the world map as one of the best-managed deepwater fisheries in the world. But there are a few lesser-known yet equally interesting facts about George Clement few may know…

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Ray Hilborn: MPA’s not the answer to ocean biodiversity, sustainability efforts

Republished from SeafoodSource.com.
A global movement to create additional marine protected areas (MPAs) has been steadily gaining traction in recent years, with the initiative picking up milestone victories in the past few months.
In January, newly inaugurated U.S. President Joe Biden signed an executive order committing to a “30 by 30” goal, whereby the United States would designated 30 percent of its land and territorial waters to conservation by the year 2030. The move heightened the potential that MPAs will be used as a tool to tackle climate change.

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Trawling for the truth about fishing

Richard O'Driscoll, NIWA's Chief Scientist for Fisheries, calmly and clearly lays out the flaws in Seaspiracy and reiterates the science that goes into making New Zealand’s fisheries one of the most sustainable in the world.

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Fish stocks confirmed to be in good shape

The latest Status of our Fish Stocks, as assessed annually by the Ministry for Primary Industries (MPI), shows New Zealand’s sustainability credentials are holding up globally. Some 91 percent of all assessed commercial catch has no sustainability issues according to the latest science. And what that means, is the other nine percent is actively being rebuilt through catch limit reductions or closures, as they were found to be below an acceptable level.

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NZ’s deepwater fisheries – a success story

With misinformation on seafood at an all-time high right now, it is more important than ever to spread as widely as possible the truth about the sustainability of New Zealand fisheries and the environmental care that is going into protecting our marine space.

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Jeremy Helson: In defence of New Zealand fisheries

New Zealand has a robust and strictly enforced Quota Management System (QMS) which was designed to ensure our fisheries are sustainable and the wider aquatic environment protected. The QMS is a global success story. Some New Zealand fisheries were once overfished and most have recovered to levels where they can be sustainably used. Orange roughy is a great example of this and is now independently certified as sustainable and healthy by the Marine Stewardship Council.

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Our response to Seaspiracy

Ray Hilborn and his colleagues at Sustainable Fisheries UW have set up a scientific resource library on their website to combat misinformation and to explain the science of sustainable seafood. In this 3,000-word point-by-point scientific rebuttal to Seaspiracy, they dive into the science and data. Basically, most of the filmmakers' claims come from very old, outdated studies and/or egregious misunderstandings.

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The future of commercial fishing in Aotearoa New Zealand

A report on a review into New Zealand’s fisheries management “The future of commercial fishing in Aotearoa New Zealand” was released on 24 March 2021. This report was compiled by the Prime Minister’s Chief Science Advisor, Prof Dame Juliet Gerrard and an expert panel comprised of representatives from commercial fisheries, fisheries research organisations and NGOs. It provides a suite of recommendations designed to chart a course for New Zealand commercial fisheries into the future.

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Kiwi seafood companies collaborate to help iwi

Top-quality seafood has been slashed in price in an effort to support iwi during COVID-19. Sealord and Moana New Zealand have been providing their products at discounted prices – up to 70 percent off their retail value – with iwi purchasing the product in large quantities to distribute them to whanau for free.

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2019 Posts:

For those inspired by stories of the Kraken, here’s one for you.
This five-kilo beast was recently brought aboard the FV Independent while mid-water trawling for arrow squid at the Snares.

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Orange roughy stocks continue recovery

Two orange roughy fisheries – one in the Tasman, the other centred in the Pacific and the sub-Antarctic – received substantial quota increases in the sustainability round that came into effect on 1 October 2019, the start of the new fishing year.

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Rare Red Squid

For those inspired by stories of the Kraken, here’s one for you.
This five-kilo beast was recently brought aboard the FV Independent while mid-water trawling for arrow squid at the Snares.

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2018 Posts:

For those inspired by stories of the Kraken, here’s one for you.
This five-kilo beast was recently brought aboard the FV Independent while mid-water trawling for arrow squid at the Snares.

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BPAs and MPAs – Is There a Difference?

New Zealand’s Benthic Protection Areas (BPAs) are internationally-recognised as a type of Marine Protected Area (MPA).  The IUCN recognises seven categories of MPAs and BPAs meet Category VI.

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MSC validates New Zealand seafood sustainability

With seventeen New Zealand fisheries recertified as sustainable by the Marine Stewardship Council (MSC) in September, some 50 percent of New Zealand’s wild marine catch now holds this gold standard of sustainability...

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Fisheries New Zealand sustainability round 2018

This year’s sustainability round, announced by Fisheries Minister Stuart Nash (September 2018), saw 11 catch limits increase and 12 decrease.
A decrease in catch has very real consequences for fishing families and should not be taken lightly, however we must be prepared to act when stocks need to be rebuilt...

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Skipper of the month – Jake McFedries

Fishing has always been an integral part of Jake McFedries’ life.
With a father who spent a fair amount of time recreationally fishing, McFedries practically grew up on the water. Being surrounded by boats and anglers and with his own love for the sea, McFedries knew he wanted to make a career out of fishing...

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Revolutionising ocean forecasting – the Moana Project

The Tasman Sea is warming at one of the fastest rates on earth, bringing widespread implications for the marine environment.

Despite New Zealand having one of the largest Exclusive Economic Zones (EEZ) in the world, there is limited information available to measure, monitor and predict how ocean warming will affect New Zealand waters.

The Moana Project has set out to address this...

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New Zealand hoki quota owners proactively choosing to reduce catch

New Zealand hoki quota owners proactively choosing to reduce catch

Published: 26 September 2018

Quota owners in the New Zealand hoki fishing industry have announced today they have proactively chosen to reduce the amount of hoki they will catch next year, in response to changing patterns they are observing in one of the...

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Increased catches from deepwater fisheries supported by science

Fisheries Minister Stuart Nash today (19/9/2018) announced his decisions on changes to fisheries catch limits from 1 October 2018.

Thirty-two catch limits were reviewed in this sustainability round.

Four deepwater fisheries were reviewed and each had their Total Allowable Commercial Catch (TACC) limits increased, decisions supported by the best available science.

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The Squid Fishery and New Zealand Sea Lions

The Squid Fishery and New Zealand Sea Lions

Published: 28 August 2018

What’s causing the decline of sea lions? And what’s the remedy?

The New Zealand sea lion population at Auckland Islands (Figure 1) is assessed to have declined from around...

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Skipper of the month – Elle Kibblewhite

Skipper of the month - Elle Kibblewhite

Published: 25 July 2018

Elle Kibblewhite has plenty of sea-faring achievements to her name. At 16, Elle began working with her Dad, Richard, cray fishing and set netting on Splashzone 2 during the summer. She also gained her commercial electrician’s trade certificate.

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Skipper of the Month – Stephan Fridell

Skipper of the Month - Stephan Fridell

Published: 27 June 2018

After 40 days at sea and even longer away from his family, just moments after setting foot on dry land, Skipper Stephan Fridell received just what every Dad would be longing for – a huge bear hug from his two children....

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Large-scale changes bring opportunity for further collaboration

Large-scale changes bring opportunity for further collaboration

Published: 17 October 2017

[caption id="attachment_5976" align="alignnone" width="604"] Photograph by Peter Marriott/NIWA[/caption]

The seafood industry and the Ministry for Primary Industries continue to collaborate during the rollout of the Integrated Electronic Monitoring and Reporting System (IEMRS).

The...

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Fish stocks on the rise

Fish stocks on the rise

Published: 17 October 2017

Increased biomass in red gurnard and orange roughy fisheries has seen a rise in catch limits.

The Ministry for Primary Industries announced the adjustments as part of their twice-yearly fisheries sustainability review.

The orange...

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The Story of New Zealand Orange Roughy

The story of New Zealand orange roughy:  From the “poster child” of unsustainable fishing to Marine Stewardship Council assessment.

By P.L. Cordue and originally published on CFOOD. Published: 9 December 2016 In the late 1970s, a “huge” new fisheries resource was discovered in deep water on the north Chatham Rise. In the early days, there was somewhat...
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Marine biodiversity needs more than protection

Marine biodiversity needs more than protection

To sustain the seas, advocates of marine protected areas and those in fisheries management must work together, not at cross purposes, urges Ray Hilborn.

Reposted from Nature Magazine, 13 July 2016

On 1 September, government leaders, directors of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and others will meet in Hawaii...

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Ray Hilborn Asks If the Drive for MPA’s is Environmentally Shortsighted

Most NGO’s assume that Marine Protected Areas (MPA’s) are an unmitigated good, with little thought to their impact on the global food system. But, converting large areas of productive fisheries to no-take zones, while appealing to NGO’s, actually may increase global environmental degredation. The reason, says Professor Ray Hilborn in our latest video, is that marine protein...
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One in four British children think haddock is a soccer player

Nearly a quarter of British children don’t know that haddock is a fish, thinking instead that it is the name of a soccer player. This misconception is almost laughable until one realizes that we are talking about the potential seafood consumers of tomorrow. Unfortunately the misconceptions don’t stop there. In a survey carried out by the...
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Why fish is nature’s antidepressant

It is known to prevent against heart disease and is hailed as the secret to a long, healthy life. Now, researchers have found the Mediterranean diet can help people with depression, too. A study found people who followed the diet were happier, less stressed and reported an improved quality of life compared to those who ate fewer...
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